<div>Changed subject from previous emails.</div>On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 11:12 AM, Bert Freudenberg <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bert@freudenbergs.de">bert@freudenbergs.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im">On 31.10.2011, at 03:09, Ricardo Moran wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; Some kids told me they would want more graphics to choose in Etoys (like the ones in Scratch).<br>
<br>
</div>Why don&#39;t they use images they found on the web, or took using a camera?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>So I see a couple of issues:</div><div><ol><li>Should we include a predefined set of images similar to Scratch?</li>
<li>Why don&#39;t kids use images found on web or took using a camera?</li><li>How can we get kids scripting (as opposed to just &quot;playing with images&quot; and creating cartoons)</li></ol><div><u>On item 1</u>: Should we include a predefined set of images similar to Scratch?</div>
</div><div>The argument I have heard against including images is that kids that:</div></div><blockquote class="webkit-indent-blockquote" style="margin: 0 0 0 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>
&quot;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); ">Seeing graphics that they might not be able to create themselves easily can discourage them from make their own paintings.&quot;</span></div>
</div></blockquote><div class="gmail_quote"><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); ">If that is the case, then why do are there so many kid created graphics in Scratch projects?  I have, on admittedly limited evidence, seen kids getting stuck drawing, because they feel they can&#39;t draw well enough, which slows/stops them.</span></div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial; font-size: small; "><u>On item 2:</u></span></span> Why don&#39;t kids use images found on web or took using a camera?</div>
<div>Good question, once I show kids that this can be done, they do it.  So perhaps it is an issue of &quot;discoverability&quot;?</div><div>There is a quick guide on <u>Objects/Digital Images</u> which is XO specific. But does not indicate how to import an image from the Web on XO.</div>
<div>Also, the switching to journal/copy to clipboard, ... may be too many steps, which might discourage kids.</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial; font-size: small; "><u>On item 3:</u></span></span> How can we get kids scripting, modeling, simulating  (as opposed to just &quot;playing with images&quot; and creating cartoons)</div>
<div>Great question, need to think about this some more.  Not that playing with images, creating cartoons and using Etoys as a PowerPoint replacement are bad things, but how do we get them scripting, modeling, simulating as well.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Stephen</div></div>