<html>
<body>
Right --<br><br>
Well, the <u>next</u> version of Etoys ... (heh heh) ...<br><br>
... will make it much much easier to expose new functionality to the
children via the Etoys interface. Currently, this is doable, and people
do it all the time (especially in Japan, Germany and Spain) but it is not
a smooth process and reveals that Etoys started life as a demo and never
got re-done as a real system.<br><br>
The OLPC machine, besides being an impressive result just on its own, is
also a strong forcing function for us to expand Etoys to a wider range of
users and also to make a better architecture underneath (and these are in
progress), Meanwhile, we have to hit the build deadlines of OLPC with the
system we have.<br><br>
However, it would be great to hear from you about the project you
actually want to do in Etoys.<br><br>
Cheers,<br><br>
Alan<br><br>
At 11:50 AM 1/23/2007, Steven Greenberg wrote:<br><br>
<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite="">On 1/23/07, <b>Alan Kay</b>
&lt;<a href="mailto:alan.kay@squeakland.org">alan.kay@squeakland.org</a>
&gt; wrote:<br>

<dl>
<dd>Hi Steven --<br><br>

<dd>What you are trying to do is not Etoys, but to do something in Squeak
Smalltalk using one of its graphics systems (called Morphic). Etoys is a
UI that rides on top of Squeak Smalltalk. Its objects are called
&quot;Players&quot; and the associated graphics of a player is called its
&quot;costume&quot;. Using Squeak Smalltalk, you can talk to the costume
of a player by saying &quot;self costume blah blah&quot;, where blah blah
is a message that morphs understand.<br><br>

</dl><br><br>
Hi Alan, thanks for the answer.&nbsp; I think I actually do want EToys
because I want my objects to be generically scriptable using tiles.&nbsp;
That example I asked about was chosen because it's something I already
know how to do in squeak :-).&nbsp; It's not the actual project, just a
learning exercise. <br><br>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Regards,<br>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Steve<br>
</blockquote></body>
</html>